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Three Defendants from the High On Life Group Plead Guilty

Yellowstone National ParkNews Release

Three Defendants from the High On Life Group Plead Guilty

MAMMOTH HOT SPRINGS, WY -Three defendants from the Canadian group High On Life

appeared Thursday, Enero 19, before U.S. Magistrate Judge Mark Carman at the Yellowstone Justice

Center in Mammoth Hot Springs, WY. Two defendants attended the hearing in person and one

defendant was on the phone. Charles Ryker Gamble, Alexey Andriyovych Lyakh, and Justis Cooper

Price Brown pleaded guilty to violations in Yellowstone National Park, Zion National Park, Death

Valley National Park, and Mesa Verde National Park.

The group, consisting of Charles Ryker Gamble, Alexey Andriyovych Lyakh, Justis Cooper Price

Brown, Parker Heuser, and Hamish McNab Campbell Cross, were the subject of multiple investigations

by the National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management.

  1. Gamble and A. Lyakh pleaded guilty to charges in Yellowstone National Park that included

disorderly conduct by creating a hazardous condition and foot travel in a thermal area. They also

pleaded guilty to charges for commercial photography without a permit in Zion National Park; use of a

drone in a closed area, riding a bike in wilderness, and commercial photography without a permit in

Parque Nacional Death Valley; and the use of a drone in a closed area in Mesa Verde National Park. Both

individuals will serve seven days in jail, pay more than $2,000.00 in fines, restitution, community service

payments paid to Yellowstone Forever, and fees. They will be on probation for five years which

includes being banned from public lands managed by the U.S. Department of Interior, U.S. Department

of Agriculture, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. As a condition of probation, C. Gamble and A.

Lyakh will remove from their social media accounts all photographs and videos taken of public lands

where they were charged violations.

  1. Price Brown pleaded guilty to charges in Yellowstone National Park that included disorderly conduct

by creating a hazardous condition and foot travel in a thermal area. He agreed to pay over $3,500.00 en

fines, restitution, community service payments paid to Yellowstone Forever, and fees. He too will be on

probation for five years which includes being banned from public lands managed by the U.S.

Department of Interior, U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

On November 1, 2016, two defendants from High On Life, Hamish Cross and Parker Heuser, pleaded

guilty to violations in Yellowstone National Park and Death Valley National Park.

The judge’s decision today sends a strong and poignant message about thermal feature protection and

seguridad,” said Yellowstone National Park Superintendent Dan Wenk. “We implore all visitors to learn

about the rules in Yellowstone, respect the rules and follow them. We ask visitors to take the

Yellowstone Pledge. Protect your park and protect yourselves by staying on the boardwalks. If you

witness resource violations, llamar 911 or contact a park ranger.

On May 16, 2016, a concerned citizen contacted park rangers in Yellowstone National Park, after seeing four individuals walking on Grand Prismatic Spring. During the course of the investigation, park

rangers identified the four individuals involved in the violations in Yellowstone National Park and

arrest warrants were issued. Through the use of social media and tips from the public, additional

investigations were conducted about the group’s activities on other federal lands.

The High On Life group was issued violation notices from:

  • Zion National Park
  • Parque Nacional Death Valley
  • Yellowstone National Park
  • Mesa Verde National Park
  • Corona Arch (BLM)
  • Bonneville Salt Flats (BLM)

-Fuentes de energía nuclear-

Acerca del Servicio de Parques Nacionales: Desde 1916, the National Park Service has been entrusted with the care of America’s more than 400 parques nacionales. With the help of volunteers and partners, we safeguard these special places and share their stories millions of people every year. Learn more at www.nps.gov.