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Destinations

Furnace Creek

Posted by on Jul 28, 2011 in Destinations | 22 comments

Furnace Creek

Furnace Creek is the heart of Death Valley and the best place to begin your visit to this incredible natural wonder. Experience the 1800s with a visit to the Furnace Creek Ranch, including the Borax Museum, 49er Café, Wrangler Steakhouse, and Corkscrew Saloon. The four-diamond Furnace Creek Inn resort opened in 1927, and every detail comes with a story. Furnace Creek Inn has played host to movie stars and world leaders. Enjoy modern amenities too, with an 18 hole golf course, 19th Hole Snackbar, swimming pools, tennis courts, great dining at the Inn Dining Room, saloons and gift shops. New in 2008: the largest private solar panel array in the U.S. Annual special events include the 49ers Reenactment, Art Shows and Astronomy events.

 

www.furnacecreekresort.com

Zabriskie Point

Posted by on Jun 28, 2011 in Destinations | 35 comments

Zabriskie Point

Zabriskie Point is one of the easiest places to reach only about 5 miles from the park visitor center and right off of Highway 190. It is probably the most photographed point in all of Death Valley. Over looking the golden colored mudstone hills that are sometimes referred to as the “Badlands of Death Valley,” Zabriskie Point offers one of the most incredible views of any part of Death Valley. After reaching the point from the Zabriskie Point parking lot, the panoramic view also includes Manly Beacon, shaped like a sharks tooth. This point is particularly spectacular in the early morning light, as well as a view of the valley floor.

Ubehebe Crater

Posted by on Jun 28, 2011 in Destinations | 56 comments

Ubehebe Crater

Over a dozen volcanoes dot the landscape of Ubehebe volcanic field. Ubehebe Crater is the largest and youngest volcanic feature, Little Hebe crater is at lower right. The paved road to the crater ends at a parking area on the north rim, though an unpaved road continues, bending back south and heading towards various remote back country areas including The Racetrack. Ubehebe Crater has a trail around the rim and a steep path down. The crater is even more colorful in spring, when yellow and purple micro flowers grow amongst the jet black ash on the upper slopes. Other paths wind through more cinder cones and craters, such as the much smaller Little Hebe Crater, which cover an area of several square miles to the south.

Titus Canyon

Posted by on Jun 28, 2011 in Destinations | 29 comments

Titus Canyon

This incredible 27 mile drive covers a wide range of interests, from geology to Native American petroglyphs to an old mining town. If you are very lucky, you may see some desert bighorn sheep. Start off outside of the park in Nevada and drive one way back into the park. This route takes you through some of the most interesting geology in the park. After about 15 miles, you will come to the ghost town of Leadville, started mostly on hype. Leadville only lasted about two years, but for mining buffs, it is a great example with a number of intact buildings. The last 4 miles of the drive take you through the narrows of Titus Canyon. The rock walls are scoured by flash floods, and rise hundreds of feet high, but are less than 20 feet wide in some places.

To get to Titus Canyon you first have to leave the park, headed east towards Beatty, Nevada. After you cross over the border into Nevada, it is almost 3 miles to the turn off for Titus Canyon on the left hand side of the road. This is a dirt road, and high clearance vehicles are needed.

Tecopa Hot Springs

Posted by on Jun 28, 2011 in Destinations | 48 comments

Tecopa Hot Springs

Originally Tecopa Hot Springs (called Yaga then) was the largest Native settlement in the region because of its natural hot springs, wildlife and wetlands, and proximity to the trading routes that became known as the Old Spanish Trail. A series of hard-rock mining camps in the late 1800s were named Tecopa after a Paiute leader who was famous for negotiating peace during those rough and tumble days. In 1908, the Tonopah and Tidewater Railroad built the Tecopa station, running through the spectacular Amargosa Canyon. Today’s traveler can take advantage of pristine desert landscapes, vivid sunsets, and Tecopa Hot Springs’ healing mineral waters at three different resorts with private baths and campgrounds with full hook-up RV spaces, the Poo-Ha-Bah Native Healing Center, or the Inyo County campground, with separate bath houses for men and women. The area blossoms with winter travelers during temperate months. Other amenities include massage services, Pastels Bistro, the Tecopa Basin Artist Gallery (both at the historic Tecopa Hot Springs Resort), an international hostel, post office, elementary school, and a variety of small shops.

In spring and fall, vast flocks of migratory birds take advantage of the marshes and surrounding canyons, particularly Grimshaw Lake, a great birding locale and protected wetland. Spring wildflower viewing, photography, bicycling, gliding, and hiking in the Kingston, Tecopa, Ibex and Sheepshead mountains are also excellent activities

Stovepipe Wells Village

Posted by on Jun 28, 2011 in Destinations | 53 comments

Stovepipe Wells Village

Stovepipe Wells Village, located approximately 24 miles northwest of Furnace Creek, is geared towards family travel where unique is the norm and the unexpected is expected. At Stovepipe Wells Village you can explore ancient rock formations, swim year round in a sparkling heated swimming pool, watch the sun set behind surrealistic sand dunes and lay your eyes on such unique animal life as squeaking lizards. And, you’re just a short distance from the most photographed sand dunes in the world, making Stovepipe Wells Village the perfect place to headquarter your Death Valley adventures.

In addition to lodging and camping, Stovepipe Wells Village also includes a gas station, convenience store, the Toll Road Restaurant and Badwater Saloon.

Shoshone Village

Posted by on Jun 28, 2011 in Destinations | 46 comments

Shoshone Village

Perched at the southeastern edge of Death Valley and a gateway to the southern Amargosa basin, the village of Shoshone is enjoyed by travelers from around the world. A lush oasis complete with a warm spring pool, inn, RV park, general store and gift shop, harkening back to yesteryear, two eateries and an airport, it is a piece of paradise in the vast Mojave desert This charming village also offers visitors a health center, post office and a museum which offers free wireless Internet access. Meander through the cemetery; explore the Dublin Gulch caves or the Tonopah and Tidewater railroad grade. Stroll by historic buildings, or hike in the surrounding hills. Stop by the Amargosa Conservancy for information about the area’s unique ecology. Browse the Gift Shop in the Shoshone Museum and meet our mammoths. It’s a great place to learn about the area’s fascinating geology, wildlife and flowers, and history spanning from the time of prehistoric animals through First American culture to mining, farming, bootlegging and more.

Shoshone Museum & Visitor Information Kiosk

Posted by on Jun 28, 2011 in Destinations | 37 comments

Shoshone Museum & Visitor Information Kiosk

Meet our local mammoths! Get free trip-planning advice and browse the Gift Shop in the Shoshone Museum. It’s a great place to learn about the area’s fascinating geology, wild life, flowers, and history spanning from the time of prehistoric animals through Native American culture to mining, farming, bootlegging and more. Catch up on your email with our free wireless Internet access.

Scotty’s Castle

Posted by on Jun 28, 2011 in Destinations | 34 comments

Scotty’s Castle

Fifty-three miles from Furnace Creek Inn & Ranch and within the park boundaries, Scotty’s Castle stands as a tribute to friendship. In the early 1900′s, Walter Scott (Death Valley Scotty) convinced Albert Johnson to grubstake his gold mining expeditions. The gold never materialized, but Johnson fell in love with Death Valley and took a liking to the colorful Scotty. Johnson and his wife, Bessie, built this two-million dollar home with luxurious appointments. However, Scotty always claimed that it was his and he was building it from the profits from his gold mine. Owned today by the National Park Service, daily interpretive tours are provided year round.

Scotty’s Snack Bar includes cold sandwiches and drinks.

Rhyolite Ghost Town

Posted by on Jun 28, 2011 in Destinations | 43 comments

Rhyolite Ghost Town

Rhyolite, Nevada is a ghost town in Nye County, Nevada, United States. It is located in the Bullfrog Hills, about 3.8 miles west of the town of Beatty, near the eastern edge of Death Valley. Goldwell Open Air Museum, a free admission outdoor sculpture park, is located at the southern entrance to Rhyolite, off Highway 374.

The town came into existence as the result of a gold rush that began in 1904, and had its peak population from 1905 to 1910, when decreased gold production led to a decline that culminated in its abandonment by 1919.